Tuesday, 22 April 2014

LISTEN: RW/FF Radio - 21/04/2014

Apologies that last week's show (14/04-2014) still hasn't been uploaded. This is due to problems with the sound during the original broadcast. But here is last night's edition of RW/FF Radio. This week's show features new music from The Crookes, King Gizzard And The Lizard Wizard, Paul Weller, and Two Skies, as well as magic from the past courtesy of Mansun, Iggy Pop, Symposium, The Teardrop Explodes, Placebo, The Coral and others... all that plus another edition of The Blind Selector, and the "regular" '1 To Z' features a solo track from the icon that is Brett Anderson

Ben P Scott hosts RW/FF Radio every Monday night 7-8pm. As well as the most essential new releases, you'll hear lost treasures and classics from the past. Expect everything from indie, shoegaze, electronica, krautrock, psychedelica, funk, soul, punk, alternative, rock and much more.


Track Of The Day: The Vickers - 'She's Lost'

This song was originally released as a single in May 2013. Which means that this "new" Track Of The Day isn't technically that new. However, it does appear as the opener from 'Ghosts', which is the recent debut album from Italian psych-pop combo The Vickers. The lysergic swoop of 'She's Lost' mixes bright melody, ticking rhythms and effectively simple bass notes into a 60s flavoured haze, occasionally offering little glimpses of garage rock too. The impressive 12 track 'Ghosts' was released at the end of March and can be heard at their BandCamp page HERE.

The LP is described as "A kaleidoscopic collection of songs, a twisty and colourful journey through the lights and shades of the modern life. Lose yourself within the words and the echoes, take a walk on the spatial guitars and keyboards, follow the whirling bass lines..."



REWIND: Peter Gabriel - 'Exposure'

Today's 'Rewind' selection is taken from another album that I have only just purchased recently. When visiting the Revolver record shop in Weston-Super-Mare a few weeks ago, I picked up a vinyl copy of Peter Gabriel's confusingly self-titled second LP from 1978. I say confusingly, because Gabriel's first four albums were all self-titled and can only be identified by their sleeves. So I'll refer to this as "the fingernails album". Some call it "Scratch". Guitarist Robert Fripp served as producer, and his influence on the album is evident in the use of his "Frippertronics" on the superbly weird 'Exposure'. The album reached No. 10 on the UK charts.


For an article about the shop I bought this LP from (and the place where the above photo was taken) go HERE.



Monday, 21 April 2014

Track Of The Day: Two Skies - '(In Flight) Hyperventilation'

A psychedelic three piece from Sheffield, Two Skies released their latest EP 'Red', a few weeks ago on March 24. '(In Flight) Hyperventilation' has a dark vibrancy about it, serving up a cosmic avalanche of delicious guitars, reverberating bass and spaced-out vocals. A press release describes their music as a "drugged-out, morning-after concoction of psychedelic freak outs" that are "influenced by late night jam sessions and David Lynch films..." The 'Red' EP has proved a hit with God Is In The TV's Simon Godley, who wrote: "Everything about this is big. Not just satisfied with having one, the name of the band is Two Skies. And their huge sound fills just about every inch of both."

The band have dates lined up for the next few months, including a support slot with the magnificent Ultrasound. Details can be found below...



April
26 - Abandon, Manchester

May
09 - Rebel Rebel Club, Black Heart, Camden
16 - This Feeling @ Purple Turtle, London
17 - O2 Academy, Sheffield
25 - Sebright Arms, Bethnal Green

June
09 - Gullivers, Manchester (w/ Elephant Stone)

July
12 - Hebden Bridge Trades Club, (w/ Ultrasound)

REWIND: Iggy Pop - 'Some Weird Sin'

Iggy Pop turns 67 years old today (April 21). Hard to believe he even made it to 57 to be honest, but the years of alcohol and drug intake has not affected this rock legend's ability to keep on performing and recording, whilst continuing to outlive his friends and bandmates. 

Today's track comes from the first Iggy Pop album I ever bought, which I purchased after becoming obsessed with the title track. 1977's 'Lust for Life' was his second solo release and his second collaboration with David Bowie, following 'The Idiot' earlier in the same year. 

It remains Iggy's most commercially popular album and his highest-charting release in the UK. From it here's the superb 'Some Weird Sin', which was co-written by Bowie and recorded at Hansa Studio by the Wall in Berlin. 

Happy birthday Iggy.



REVIEW: Embrace - 'Embrace' (Cooking Vinyl Records)

Some people are never going to give Embrace a good review, no matter how good their records are. Because they're dismissed as a bunch of crap post-Britpop balladeers, they are seen as rather uncool by certain sections of the music world. I bet some critics are sharpening their knives as we speak, and actually looking forward to giving Embrace's sixth album a kicking. They've made up their minds about it before the first track has even started. I approach this review from a completely different angle. 

I'm also not very keen on a lot of the band's work, but I do in fact highly rate their first two albums, particularly the magnificent 1998 debut 'The Good Will Out'. They showed so much promise back then, and looked like they were going to be the next big thing. The follow up 'Drawn From Memory' was a flawed but underrated record that didn't do as well commercially or critically, not helped by a strange choice of singles. The third album from 2001 had it's moments, but their time had already passed. They returned a few years later in the mid 2000's, but this time as an outfit aiming themselves directly for the U2/Coldplay audience. Although they shifted quite a few units, their fourth and fifth albums consisted of bland and insignificant sounding examples of dullardry. After taking seven years off, the announcement of their return had got me hoping for a return to the brilliant form of their early days. So I WANT this album to be good. 

My hopes have been deflated. There's nothing here as rousingly anthemic as 'All You Good Good People', or as beautifully haunting as 'Fireworks'. Nor is there the surging guitar power of 'One Big Family', the delicate sweetness of 'Now You're Nobody' or the sweeping emotion of 'Come Back To What You Know'. Nor is there the uplifting melancholy of 'You're Not Alone', or the resigned sigh of 'Liar's Tears'. Not even a daft but strangely loveable kazoo-featuring novelty like 'Hooligan'. But it would be unfair to say that Embrace are no longer capable of doing the things they used to be great at doing. They manage it twice.


The suggestion that the self titled 'Embrace' is some sort of reinvigorated new beginning or return to form is revealed to be an untruth after the slightly promising electronic flavoured opener 'Protection' ends and the unimaginative New Order pastiche 'In The End' begins. It's very much like the previous two albums but with more synths, as is 'The Devil Looks After His Own'. The irritating, autotuned 'Refugees' is dire, but 'I Run' improves on things vastly, and approaches the sort of heartfelt drama they used to do so well. 'At Once' is also a beautiful and uplifting moment that comes close to reprising the old magic. But these two flashes of brilliance are alone in their quality. 

If you didn't realise that 'Follow You Home' plagiarises from Muse's 'Starlight' and U2's 'With Or Without You' (as well as a few other songs) it wouldn't sound that bad. Memorable, catchy even. But not in a good way, more of an annoying way. Plus those boyband backing vocals on the chorus REALLY don't do them any favours. And isn't singing about following someone home just a tiny bit creepy? The pulsing electro beats of 'Quarters' are surprising at first, and the verses aren't too bad. But as soon as it settles into any kind of a groove, a painful falsetto chorus and an ill-advised attempt at a bit of dubstep lets it down badly. You can almost sense that some of the band themselves may not have been keen.


This almost obligatory increased presence of beats and synths tries to ensure fans that this 2014 Embrace are firmly with the programme. After all, you can't take seven years off and not make an effort to catch up with the times. But all it sounds like is a limp attempt to follow the crowd. It's bland and it's conformist. Trying too hard to do things they're not good at, and not utilising the qualities that made them so endearing when they first emerged in the late 90s. The production makes parts of the record sound lifeless, ensuring that no sort of edge is present anywhere. The only attempt at upping the tempo is the tuneless misfire 'Self Attack Mechanism', while the closing 'Thief On My Island' buzzes with a dark power, although it doesn't really go anywhere, and the extended outro is a waste of time. 

In reality, I suppose none of it is hideously bad or unbearable to listen to. It's just like a grey, featureless canvas. And there are two pretty good songs that remind you how great Embrace once were. But for listeners hoping for that return to form, prepare for a disappointment. 4/10


1 To Z: Brett Anderson - 'Brittle Heart'

Time for a '1 To Z' selection, the latest in a long line of songs that will eventually feature every band and artist in my record collection. Today it's the turn of a songwriting legend and the owner of a terrific voice, the iconic figure that is Brett Anderson. After Suede split in 2003, Brett formed The Tears with former bandmate Bernard Butler before embarking on a solo career that has so far produced four studio albums. The most recent was 2011's excellent 'Black Rainbows' which according to a review I wrote upon its release "shines with an alluring confidence" and "is certainly no substandard gap-filling solo project". Read the rest of that review HERE.  Here's the album's lead single 'Brittle Heart', a stunning yet gorgeously subtle pull on the heartstrings that features a classic Anderson chorus and a simple but effective guitar solo.


LISTEN: The RW/FF Compilation Volume 16

Here is the 16th edition of The RW/FF Compilation, which you can listen to via the Mixcloud player below. It showcases the music that has featured in the column over the last few weeks, mostly stuff from March and April. 

Just imagine if the 'Now!' albums featured the best recent music instead of a load of lowest-common-denominator shite... they would sound like this! I don't have regular dates set for each of these mixtape-type things, instead I just wait until I have an 80 minute CD's worth of great new music to make up each compilation. Contrary to what some ignorant people think, there is plenty of excellent new music out there, as is proved by every one of these brilliant mixes. The idea is to buy all of these tracks and burn onto a blank disc, hence why each compilation will be roughly the length of a CD.




Featuring
BROKEN HANDS - NO ONE LEFT TO MEET
SOPHIE ELLIS-BEXTOR - WRONG SIDE OF THE SUN
THE FAUNS - SEVEN HOURS
NUDYBRONQUE - PEACHY KEEN
SPECTRES - THE SKY OF ALL PLACES
THE MOONS - HEART AND SOUL
BROKEN RECORDS - SEE YOU ON THE WAY DOWN
JIMI GOODWIN - DIDSBURY GIRL
ELBOW - MY SAD CAPTAINS
PEACE - WORLD PLEASURE
GULP - VAST SPACE
WILKO JOHNSON AND ROGER DALTREY - ALL THROUGH THE CITY
EELS - MISTAKES OF MY YOUTH
BLACK SUBMARINE - HER SO RAIN
ESBEN AND THE WITCH - NO DOG

Sunday, 20 April 2014

Track Of The Day: Pixies - 'Greens And Blues'

About two years ago, I heard leaked news from a close source that the Pixies were busy recording a new album. Things must have been delayed somewhat by the departure of Kim Deal and the subsequent search to replace her, since the LP has only just arrived recently. It's not clear whether it was even intended as an album, due to the twelve tracks being previously released as four track EPs over the last few months. 'Indie Cindy' is their first studio album since 1991's 'Trompe le Monde' and will be released 28 April in UK/Europe. “We started seriously talking about recording new music about four years ago,” Pixies drummer David Lovering explained. “New music seemed like something we just had to do, we just couldn’t continue to go out and tour without anything new. So the talk evolved into writing and recording, and we’re all very happy with the way everything worked out.”

'Indie Cindy' will be available in a number of different formats, including a standard 12-track single-CD; a two-disc, gatefold album pressed on 180-gram vinyl; and an expanded digital download available exclusively through iTunes that includes a bonus 13-track set recorded during the band’s recent North American tour. From the LP, here is the shimmering 'Greens And Blues'.



REWIND: Mansun - 'Egg Shaped Fred'

Since it's Easter Sunday, I thought I'd better do a themed selection for today's Rewind. So with a theme of eggs, here's the greatest song to ever mention eggs in the title. I'm also featuring it because I went out to my local record shop yesterday on Record Store Day, and instead of coming back with any of this year's limited edition releases, I returned with two old 7" singles by Mansun. Ones that I don't already own! In fact I've NEVER before owned a copy of the 'One' EP on any format, so it's about bloody time. 'Egg Shaped Fred' features as the lead track on this four track, 33rpm 7", which was released in March 1996, reaching number 37 in the singles chart. The melody and lyrics are apparently based on a nursery rhyme as frontman Paul Draper explains: "This was a nursery rhyme that kids at school sand sneeringly at me because I had an egg shaped head apparently. So I purged my soul of those kids with this song! Everyone else thought it was mad for a rock band to release a nursery rhyme. Saved on the therapy though."

For fans of this incredible group, there is a Mansun fans convention taking place in the band's hometown of Chester. It's happening in August, and more info can be found HERE in an interview that RW/FF did with the event's organiser Andy Lyth.



Record Store Day 2014 - at Raves From The Grave in Frome - photos and video

After taking part in this event for the last five years, this year's Record Store Day was slightly different. Since I want upcoming album releases a lot more than any of the RSD exclusives, I decided that the day was just going to be business as usual for me. It would have been nice to pick up a copy of the Paul Weller single, but due to having to do my day job in the morning, I was unable to queue up outside the shop at the crack of dawn even if I wanted to. So instead I popped over to Raves From The Grave in Frome, the same place where I first took part in the event back in 2010, when Blur's 'Fool's Day' 7" attracted me there. 


The shop has been known to host some special instore shows over the last few years, but this one was VERY special. The legendary Billy Bragg performed outside of the shop to a massive crowd, who packed out the narrow streetway of shops and sang along to a short set of Bragg classics. Afterwards Billy signed records and greeted fans inside the shop, as buyers continued to browse through the shelves. After getting my copies of 'Brewing Up' and 'Talking Poetry With The Taxman' signed, it was time for me to do some shopping. None of the Record Store Day releases they had left really took my fancy, except for a 7" copy of Levellers frontman Mark Chadwick's new single 'Red Sky'. But I'm buying the album when it comes out, so didn't really feel the need to splash out £7.99 on the one song.


Instead I ventured into the shop's small back room of second hand vinyl, and as well as finding a cheap Russian copy of 'A Hard Day's Night' by The Beatles, I also found two 7" singles from one of my favourite bands of all time... Mansun. So for the first time ever, I now own the 'One' EP, the band's first release on Parlophone Records from 1996. I also couldn't resist buying a clear vinyl copy of the classic 1997 single 'Closed For Business', and at £4 each I got myself some bargains. Music that I really needed too, rather than some fancy reissues of records that I already own. 

So here's to Raves From The Grave in Frome, an excellent place to shop for music and a great place to browse the crammed shelves of.




Friday, 18 April 2014

RW/FF With Ben P Scott #46

This week: the fantastic new album from The Crookes, and the split LP from Thought Forms and Esben And The Witch. New music from Echo And The Bunnymen, The Diaphanoids, Cherry Ghost, The Juan MacLean, The Amazing Snakeheads and Johnny Cash (OK, so THAT one isn't exactly new). All that plus the pick of this year's Record Store Day releases from Paul Weller, Temples/Jagwar Ma, Django Django and the insane King Gizzard And The Lizard Wizard.



Last year, Wiltshire-based post-rock trio Thought Forms joined Esben And The Witch and the mighty Teeth Of The Sea for a triple headed tour around the UK. At the Bristol leg of the tour, Charlie from Thought Forms revealed to RW/FF that they were planning a split LP with Esben, a prospect that left me waiting for this with much anticipation. Its arrival doesn't disappoint, as both bands deliver sides that compliment the other brilliantly and fit together cohesively as a whole. 


The first side of this Invada-issued piece of vinyl belongs to Thought Forms, who begin with the patient, intricate drumwork and ghostly ambience of 'Your Bones'. Sullenly atmospheric guitars ring through an ethereal mist as the icy glide of carefully applied vocals ascends throughout, before erupting into heavier moods. Going off with a bang from the outset is the excellent 'For The Moving Stars', where the thriving energy, zippy riffs and MBV flavours provide a brilliant moment that's as accessible and immediate as this band have ever sounded. They switch to a lower gear for the tortured, downbeat Sonic Youth-meets-Nirvana vibes and howling guitars of 'Silver Kiss', rounding off side A in bleak fashion.


Turn the record over, and it's apparent that Esben And The Witch aren't fucking about. From the moment it bursts in, it's their astonishing 'No Dog' that provides the record's highlight, a deep, intense blast of ferocity and claustrophobia, pushing forwards with menacing momentum and awesome melodrama. Although it's length and split LP status makes it feel a bit like a gap-bridger in places and perhaps a warm up for what's to come next from both parties, if you're a fan of either band, you'd be an absolute fool not to add this to your record shelf. For everyone else, I'd say this is a great place to start. Read my full 8/10 review HERE.



Combining 50s era romance with vibes from the indie disco is something that Sheffield four piece The Crookes have been doing rather well for the last few years. They've produced some very promising moments, yet stretching the magic out over the course of a whole album seemed to prove a challenge for them. So while 2011's 'Chasing After Ghosts' and its follow up 'Hold Fast' certainly had a few high points, neither felt consistent enough to really hit the mark. With their third album the band realise their potential and move themselves up to a new level. A sense of isolation emerges every so often, maybe due to the LP being recorded in an old abandoned church located in the Italian Alps. 



The pacey 'Before The Night Falls' glistens with chiming guitar hooks and comes charged with vitality and vibrancy, storming into a powerfully emotive chorus. Towards the end, another spellbinding melody arises and knocks you off your feet once again. An exciting highlight that displays The Crookes at the very top of their game. 'Outsiders' puts forward magnificent melodies that set the heart racing, and exemplifies the spirit of these bright underachievers who revel in being out of step with popular fashion, taking great pride in doing things their own way. 


Proof of just how far the songwriting has come is demonstrated with the beautifully resigned elegance of 'Howl', one of those songs with a melody so good, it's hard to believe nobody thought of it before. Something has happened to The Crookes. They've moved up more than a few notches to the point where they are no longer a promising indie band, but a great one. Read the full 8.2/10 review HERE.


Quite often, the quality of posthumously released albums from well-loved artists can vary wildly. After all, most unreleased material stays unreleased for a good reason, certainly the case with the terrible Michael Jackson rejects that have been issued since his death. So when it was announced that a long lost Johnny Cash album that was recorded in the 1980s had been discovered and was being prepared for release, it sounded a little bit iffy to me. Luckily, 'Out Among the Stars' is a most enjoyable listen indeed and a fine addition to his back catalogue. Cash did some sessions in the 80s with famed countrypolitan producer Billy Sherrill, and the results were shelved by Cash's record company Columbia. Cash also recorded the 1981 album 'The Baron' with Sherrill in an attempt to turn around his dismal album sales but the strategy did not work, leaving his record executives eager to dump him. Many years later it's rather a different story indeed. God Is In The TV remarked that "Not surprisingly, there are no classic gems to shine out and it contains just two self-penned songs. It is, however, a worthy release, so here’s the title track for you." I'd agree with that. Here's his version of the darkly amusing, tongue-in-cheek 'I Drove Her Out Of My Mind', which was written by Gary Gentry and Hillman Hall. "I was really upset when it didn't come out," says Gentry, "when Cash did that song, it was like God saying, 'You did good getting off cocaine and whiskey, so here's a little gift from me.' I was there the day he cut the song, so I knew he'd done it, and I just wanted to hear it...


Excellent new track from the legendary Echo And The Bunnymen, taken from the upcoming album 'Meteorites'. The LP is the band's first material in five years and follows 2009's 'The Fountain'. Anthemically psychedelic and seven minutes long, it's an epic that sees Ian McCulloch and Will Sergeant back on tremendous form. Mac says: "At long last we’ve made the worthy successor to ‘Crocodiles’, ‘Heaven Up Here’, ‘Porcupine’, and ‘Ocean Rain’. ‘Meteorites’ is what Echo and the Bunnymen mean and are meant to be…up there in Heaven…untouchable, celestial, beautiful, and real…it has changed my life."

I went to see Echo And The Bunnymen last year when they were on tour with James. See a review of their Bristol gig HERE



Since their last album 'Beneath This Burning Shoreline' was fantastic, it gives me great pleasure to welcome back the wonderful Cherry Ghost. That last album was released four years ago, so new material has been a long time coming. Luckily what I've heard so far is lovely, particularly this beautifully melancholic but dreamily hopeful little number. 'Herd Runners', which will be their third album, comes out on May 12 via Heavenly Recordings. "Exploring different styles has helped my own songs,” says frontman and songwriter Simon Aldred, “Musicians need to stretch themselves and keep on learning... These songs aren’t as dark as those on previous records. This time round I thought it was important to keep a real empathy for the people I’m writing about.” Recorded in Sheffield with long-term Richard Hawley collaborator Colin Elliot and mixed in Bath with Dan Austin, 'Herd Runners' is described in a press release as "ten perfectly crafted tales of heartbreak and hope." Throughout May 2014, Cherry Ghost will tour with ex-Beautiful South and Housemartins frontman Paul Heaton as he releases his fourth solo album alongside fellow Beautiful South singer Jacqui Abbott.



OK, I've managed to wait a few weeks before featuring anything from this record, but I can wait no more. 'LSME' by The Diaphanoids is a seriously good album that has been ruling my world over the last month or so, and I am very excited to introduce the group's music to my readers. Consisting of eight trippy instrumentals, 'LSME' is described as "an acid psychallucisergic album full of seventies' kosmische flavours fuzzed-out guitars and motorik rhythms." Psychallucisergic? It has to be good when only a made up word can sum it up. The Diaphanoids also have a VERY interesting background, one of them (Andrea Bellentani) wrote songs for Pavarotti, and the other half of the duo (Marco 'Simon' Maccari) is an Italian dance producer who worked with 'Ride On Time' hitmakers Black Box! Dipped in cosmic funk and eastern instrumentation, the title track is like an intergalactic downwards rollercoaster speeding in constant motion, punctuated by low, meaty stabs of bass, effective use of repetition and guitars that glide across the surface. Sounding not unlike an orchestra being shot into space, the term psychedelic big beat comes to mind. Astounding. A slightly edited version can be heard below... 'LSME' is released through Tirk Recordings on April 28, which is looking like a bumper day for new releases... 



Quite simply an essential resource for any true music lover, BBC 6Music continues to guide me to some incredible stuff. The man who introduced me to a lot of the music I bought in the late 90s is still doing his thing on air, with 6Music his residence. Yes, I'm talking about indie scene legend Steve Lamacq, who played this superb tune on his show last week... 

A band I'm still completely unfamiliar with, The Amazing Snakeheads are due to release their debut album 'Amphetamine Ballads' next week on April 14. They are signed to Domino Records and are from Glasgow. Imagine if Joy Division and The Stooges formed a supergroup and then boarded a rocket to space. Raw and energised intensity.



Here's one that was actually released a while back, but which has only come to my attention recently after receiving some airplay from Lauren Laverne on BBC 6Music. 

Seriously infectious disco-shaped excellence coming out of New York, featuring the vocals of Nancy Whang (ex LCD Soundsystem), whose savvy tones make this chunk of dancefloor gold even more irresistible. 

Released on DFA Records, 'Get Down (With My Love)' precedes a full length album, which will be coming later in the year. 


Tomorrow (April 19) music fans, collectors and opportunists will be queuing outside record shops up and down the UK for Record Store Day. I feel a strong need to remind people that the yearly event shouldn't just be about buying overpriced and often unnecessary reissues or snapping up rare items to flog for a profit. In my opinion it should be just as much about digging through the crates, scanning the shelves and finding something that appeals. Even if your budget and financial priorities limit your choices to a browse through the bargains section, even that's enough to do your bit. A couple of weeks ago when I visited Weston-Super-Mare, I discovered a brilliant little vinyl shop called Revolver. I liked it so much, I wrote an article about it and interviewed the shop's owner Andy. Read that HERE. Since its Record Store Day tomorrow, I have also been re-publishing some old features, including this one HERE about record shops in Wiltshire and Bath past and present. You can also see what RW/FF got up to when RSD came to the city of Bath for the first time last year in this article HERE. In fact to save you some time, just go to THIS link and you can read every single RW/FF post related to record shops.


Record Store Day may mainly deal in re-releases and pricey collectors items, but each year there are also always a number of undeniably special records on offer, one of them being a beautifully coloured picture disc that features two of the most exciting bands to emerge in recent times. On one side, Jagwar Ma give the Temples treasure 'Shelter Song' a bassy house makeover while reinterpreting the psychedelic moods in a contemporary, dancefloor-friendly fashion. Alternatively you can opt for the flipside where the Kettering-based four piece put their big drums and 60s flavours on to Jagwar's fantastic 'Man I Need'...


Another track being released on stunning multicoloured vinyl by Heavenly Recordings, available tomorrow. You can also find this on an album entitled 'Float Along - Fill Your Lungs' which was released last year in 2013. The brilliantly named King Gizzard And The Lizard Wizard are an Australian band who are described as "Completely fried theremin-wielding psychopaths." Sounds like a recommendation if there ever was one.

Beginning as a heavy, lumbering sitar-powered drone, the vocals enter at a surprisingly early point for such a lengthy track. But this is pretty much a two-parter as the title suggests, and although the latter bit kicks in under four minutes into this crazed 16 minute celestial epic, it doesn't peak too early and seems to be running on some sort of musical superfuel. Astonishing sounds will fill your head and you might feel a touch overwhelmed after being taken on such a demented journey. Listen now. You'll be glad you did.


I suppose I'd better cram in more RSD releases before the big day. Here's one from the brilliant Django Django, their first new material in two years. Excpet technically it's not, since the song is a cover. A cover of a Monkees track! Don't worry, it's a good one. Although best known as a made-for-TV boyband, the soundtrack to their 1968 movie 'Head' is regarded as a psychedelic classic in many quarters. I still haven't ever heard it, but one day my curiosity will change that. Django Django's version of 'Porpoise Song' can also be found on the upcoming 'Late Night Tales' compilation which the band have compiled. More info on that HERE.



Tomorrow will be the fifth year that I have taken part in the event, but this year has seen a bit of negativity surrounding the event. I agree completely that out of the 700+ releases hitting the shops tomorrow, most of them are pointless and completely inessential in every way possible. Which means that all the best stuff is going to be buried in amongst all the junk. To be honest, as a music buyer, I am only interested in buying music that I don't already own. So the stream of overpriced reissues is of no interest to me. Instead, I am going to do what music lovers should be doing on Record Store Day... Buying records. Records that I actually need. I buy records all year round, and tomorrow is going to be no different. However as well as the Temples/Jagwar Ma 12", I am still tempted to shell out some cash on this brand new and rather 'White Album'-esque Paul Weller track, which is also going to be appearing on his upcoming 'Modern Classics 2' compilation, an album that rounds up the highlights of his career from 1999 to the present day. Because I own all the tracks on that compilation, it would make more sense for me to purchase the single instead, hence why The Modfather's RSD offering is at the top of my list.



After trying to decide which I was going to queue outside on the day, my mind has been made up for me by the folks at the original Raves From The Grave shop in Frome. A little while ago, the highly recommended Somerset record shop announced that the legendary Billy Bragg has agreed to play an instore gig for this year's Record Store Day. Bragg will be performing at 3pm (giving him time to buy his RSD vinyl first!) Recommended local singer/songwriter Jordan Whatley will also be playing a set at the Warminster store at 11am. Copies of his debut EP 'The Shadowed Planet' will be available for sale, and a review of that release can be found HERE.



If you live in or near Bristol, the fantastic Rise Records has a whole day of live music planned, including the amazing East India Youth at 8.30pm. More info HERE.


Rewind:
Yes, I know I've been promising the next instalment of my musical memories for ages now. Since Christmas in fact! It WILL be coming soon, do not fear...

Back next week. Or possibly the week after.

http://rwffmusic.blogspot.com/

Track Of The Day: Paul Weller - 'Brand New Toy'

As I'm sure all readers are aware, tomorrow (April 19) is Record Store Day. It will be the fifth year that I have taken part in the event, but this year has seen a bit of negativity surrounding the event. I agree completely that out of the 700+ releases hitting the shops tomorrow, most of them are pointless and completely inessential in every way possible. Which means that all the best stuff is going to be buried in amongst all the junk. To be honest, as a music buyer, I am only interested in buying music that I don't already own. So the stream of overpriced reissues is of no interest to me. Instead, I am going to do what music lovers should be doing on Record Store Day... Buying records. Records that I actually need. I buy records all year round, and tomorrow is going to be no different. However as well as the Temples/Jagwar Ma 12", I am still tempted to shell out some cash on this brand new and rather 'White Album'-esque Paul Weller track, which is also going to be appearing on his upcoming 'Modern Classics 2' compilation, an album that rounds up the highlights of his career from 1999 to the present day. Because I own all the tracks on that compilation, it would make more sense for me to purchase the single instead, hence why The Modfather's RSD offering is at the top of my list.



REWIND: The Coral - 'Spanish Main'

Today's 'Rewind' comes from The Coral

They've been out of action for a while. Since 2010 in fact. But their record label Skeleton Key Records has been releasing some rather interesting stuff lately, including an album by Neville Skelly entitled 'Carousel', which was reviewed HERE a while ago. The Coral's last album 'The Butterfly House' was a wonderful record that had me awaiting their next move with anticipation, so I shall be pleased when I hear news of their return. But today here's one from their excellent self-titled debut from 2002, one of that year's finest LPs, and one of the decade's best debuts. 

Combining sea shanties, psychedelica and Merseybeat, 'Spanish Main' is the album's terrific opener. It's brief, but it's a killer. And if you like it, have a listen to the rest of the album pronto!




Thursday, 17 April 2014

Track Of The Day: Django Django - 'Porpoise Song'


With Record Store Day happening in two day's time, I suppose I'd better cram in more RSD releases before the big day. Here's one from the brilliant Django Django, their first new material in two years. Excpet technically it's not, since the song is a cover. A cover of a Monkees track! Don't worry, it's a good one. Although best known as a made-for-TV boyband, the soundtrack to their 1968 movie 'Head' is regarded as a psychedelic classic in many quarters. I still haven't ever heard it, but one day my curiosity will change that. Django Django's version of 'Porpoise Song' can also be found on the upcoming 'Late Night Tales' compilation which the band have compiled. More info on that HERE.



REWIND: Placebo - 'You Don't Care About Us'

A bit of Placebo for today's 'Rewind' selection. No reason why, just fancied it, that's all. I remember one holiday I took with my family in Newquay back in 1998, where I spent a lot of the Monday of that week bugging my Mum to hurry up with her daily activities so we could go to the local record store and buy a copy of the 'Pure Morning' on the day it was released. Still feel guilty for that until this day. My mum must have spent epic amounts of time being dragged around music retailers when I was young, and for that I am forever grateful. This single followed 'Pure Morning' about a month or so later, and landed at number 5 in the charts. Soon after that I bought the band's second album 'Without You I'm Nothing', which contained both tracks. Don't make the mistake of thinking that their more recent material is anywhere near as good. It isn't. A review I wrote on last year's 'Loud Like Love' can be read HERE.