Friday, 28 February 2014

COMPILATIONS: The Sound Of 1995 - LISTEN

At last, it is ready. My epic 1995 compilation, six CDs of incredible music from a glorious year. 1995 was a year that changed many lives as Britpop took the nation by storm and music entered a new (and final) golden age... While parts 1,2 and 6 deals with the indie guitar legends, the other instalments of this compilation delve into more eclectic worlds. 

Truly, there was no better time for me to grow up. Sometimes part of me wishes that I could have been a few years older, so I could have understood Britpop more at the time and experienced it fully. But it was fate that it all happened before my teens. It put me on the right path, at the right age, at just the right time. A few years later it would be a lot more difficult to discover great music in the mainstream, but I got there just in time. If I didn't, I wouldn't be talking to you now. If people told me back then that those were the best days of my life, I wouldn't have believed them. At that age all I wanted to do was grow up. 1995 was a year that changed everything for me, hence why I have spent such a long time writing about it. People will argue that many of the Britpop bands were far from alternative, but to an 11 year old in the mid 90s this really was something new and exciting. Many of the bands and artists who arrived into my life in 1995 have never left. What a year. You can read two rather lengthy articles about my memories of 1995 HERE...

CD1
OASIS - HELLO
THE VERVE - THIS IS MUSIC
BLUR - STEREOTYPES
SUPERGRASS - MANSIZE ROOSTER
CAST - FINETIME
THE BOO RADLEYS - IT'S LULU
THE BLUETONES - BLUETONIC
SLEEPER - INBETWEENER
ECHOBELLY - GREAT THINGS
MCALMONT AND BUTLER - YES
MENSWEAR - DAYDREAMER
MARION - SLEEP
THE CHARLATANS - JUST LOOKING
BLACK GRAPE - IN THE NAME OF THE FATHER
GENE - HAUNTED BY YOU
CAST - SANDSTORM
DUBSTAR - NOT SO MANIC NOW
PAUL WELLER - THE CHANGINGMAN
ASH - GIRL FROM MARS
PULP - SOMETHING CHANGED
OASIS - SOME MIGHT SAY
CD2
ELASTICA - LINE UP
GENE - FOR THE DEAD
EDWYN COLLINS - A GIRL LIKE YOU
THE BOO RADLEYS - WAKE UP BOO!
OASIS - ROLL WITH IT
BLUR - COUNTRY HOUSE
PULP - COMMON PEOPLE
SUPERGRASS - ALRIGHT
SLEEPER - WHAT DO I DO NOW
ECHOBELLY - KING OF THE KERB
THE CHARLATANS - BULLET COMES
MENSWEAR - BEING BRAVE
THE VERVE - HISTORY
CAST - ALRIGHT
LEVELLERS - FANTASY
RADIOHEAD - HIGH AND DRY
TEENAGE FANCLUB - MELLOW DOUBT
BLACK GRAPE - REVEREND BLACK GRAPE
BLUR - BEST DAYS


CD3
Spiritualized - Medication
The Chemical Brothers - Leave Home
Bjork - Army Of Me
David Bowie - The Heart's Filthy Lesson
Tricky - Overcome
Leftfield - Afroleft
The Orb - Oxbow Lakes
Dreadzone - Little Britain
The Fall - The Joke
Pavement - 
The Smashing Pumpkins - Bullet With Butterfly Wings
PJ Harvey - Down By The Water
Garbage - Queer
Levellers - The Fear
Radiohead - Street Spirit (Fade Out)
CD 4
THE CHEMICAL BROTHERS - LIFE IS SWEET (WITH TIM BURGESS)
DAVID BOWIE - HALLO SPACEBOY
LEFTFIELD - MELT
TRICKY - HELL IS ROUND THE CORNER
SHANE MACGOWAN AND SINEAD O CONNOR - HAUNTED
THE CONNELLS - '74-'75
THE SMASHING PUMPKINS - TONIGHT, TONIGHT
PJ HARVEY - GIVE HIS LOVE TO ME
BJORK - ISOBEL
GARBAGE - MILK
PAVEMENT - Father To A Sister Of Thought
THE FALL - DON'T CALL ME DARLING
ELASTICA - WAKING UP
CORNERSHOP - 6am Jullander Shere
THE CHEMICAL BROTHERS - SONG TO THE SIREN
RADIOHEAD - JUST
LEVELLERS - MEN-AN-TOL
CD5
EDWYN COLLINS - THE CAMPAIGN FOR REAL ROCK
LEFTFIELD - ORIGINAL
DREADZONE - ZION YOUTH
SKUNK ANANSIE - WEAK
THE BOO RADLEYS - FROM THE BENCH AT BELVEDERE
CATATONIA - BLEED
THE CARDIGANS - CARNIVAL
GARBAGE - STUPID GIRL
TEENAGE FANCLUB - NEIL JUNG
MARION - TIME
MENSWEAR - SLEEPING IN
MORRISSEY - SUNNY
RADIOHEAD - FAKE PLASTIC TREES
DAVID BOWIE - STRANGERS WHEN WE MEET
PASSENGERS - MISS SARAJEVO
LEVELLERS - JUST THE ONE
THE BEATLES - FREE AS A BIRD
CD6
GENE - OLYMPIAN
OASIS - THE MASTERPLAN
TEENAGE FANCLUB - SPARKY'S DREAM
PULP - DISCO 2000
DUBSTAR - STARS
BLACK GRAPE - KELLY'S HEROES
ELASTICA - CONNECTION
ECHOBELLY - DARK THERAPY
ASH - ANGEL INTERCEPTOR
CAST - WALKAWAY
THE VERVE - LIFE'S AN OCEAN
SHED SEVEN - WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN TONIGHT?
SUPERGRASS - TIME
GENE - LONDON CAN YOU WAIT?
PAUL WELLER - BROKEN STONES
PULP - BAR ITALIA
BLUR - THE UNIVERSAL
OASIS - CHAMPAGNE SUPERNOVA

LISTEN: The BPS Broadcast - 24/02/2014

This week's show features new stuff from Mark Morriss, Yuck, Spiritualized, Colourmusic and more. Meanwhile, roughly 50% of this week's show is a bit of a Britpop special, to mark the end of Britpop Month on God Is In The TV that I have been part of. I've tried to steer away from the obvious names to give you music from Sleeper, Echobelly, Kula Shaker and Space instead. Plus news of a competition to win a rare promo copy of the debut single from The Anchoress!

The BPS Broadcast is where the music featured on RW/FF comes to life on the radio. Focused mainly on the finest new and forthcoming releases, you'll also hear the occasional classic and hidden treasures of the past. Expect indie, shoegaze, electronica, krautrock, psychedelica, funk, soul, punk, alternative, rock and much more.


Mondays, 7-8pm on Melksham Town Sound 



Track Of The Day: Mark Morriss - 'Guilty Again'

Life after Britpop has been kind to some and cruel to others. The Bluetones didn't do too badly as they continued all through the 00's with a faithful fanbase in tow, but had to make do without any hit singles and TV appearances after 2003. Deciding that they had done as much as they could, the band called it a day with a triumphant 'lap of honour' tour in 2011. Frontman Mark Morriss certainly doesn't seem lost without his former bandmates on his new solo album, where his ear for infectious melodies remains very much intact. It's just as enjoyable as his former band's work and contains some of his all-time greatest moments. 'Guilty Again' is firmly up there with the many highlights of his career, combining an energetic rhythm with wonderful acoustic arpeggios and sweet synth before hitting hard with the surging emotional urgency of its top notch chorus. It seems that carrying on by himself has gifted Mark Morriss a whole new lease of life, and 'A Flash Of Darkness' has confirmed him to be a great solo artist in his own right. Out of all the musical figures who emerged in the 90s, here is one still very much on top form. And he's certainly showing the more recent crop of guitar bands how memorable indie pop is done. Read my full album review HERE.


Thursday, 27 February 2014

Track Of The Day: CuT - 'Time Traveller'

I first heard this about a week ago being played on BBC 6Music and my what a tune. To my ears it's a little bit punky, and a little bit psych-y, like some sort of hybrid of Spacemen 3, The Ramones and Blur. Funnily enough, CuT (with a big C, a small u and a big T) are managed by none other than Andy Ross who used to take care of Blur. 

The London-based four piece band describe themselves as "space-punk" as well as "music with spirit", and the energy is certainly evident here. In an interview with Londontheinside.com, they stated: "We wanna write music for people who are like us and are not impressed with the mainstream, televised talent show, drudge that is forced down people’s throat’s by a unintelligent media. A majority of people are not represented by the latest major record labels lazy attempt at making money…Fuck that. The time is right for thing’s to change and for people to feel free again." Amen to that.




REWIND: Ash - 'Angel Interceptor'

Would I class Ash as a "Britpop" band? Like I explained yesterday, "Britpop means two things to me: music made by certain types of indie guitar bands released between 1994-1996, and the wider definition of Britpop that can be used to describe anything great and British that was popular in the 90s." Northern Irish three-piece Ash were more like the latter, but did arrive between 94 and 96... However their brand of indie pop-punk was undoubtedly different to the likes of Marion, Shed Seven, Menswear and Northern Uproar. 'Angel Interceptor' was on the other side of the rare 'Girl From Mars' 7" single given to me by my Dad after he had removed it from the jukebox at the club he managed during the mid 90s, the record that became the first Ash music to be added to my collection and certainly not the last. 'Angel Interceptor' was released as the third single from their debut album '1977', and was issued in October 1995. 



Wednesday, 26 February 2014

Track Of The Day: SJ Esau - 'Stubborn Step'

An interesting record that has fallen into my hands over the last few weeks is SJ Esau's new full length 'Exploding Views'. A quirky, genre-defying example of oddball freakpop, his third album is all over the place. In a good way. But what it lacks in focus it more than makes up for in imagination. On 'Stubborn Step', a pleasingly awkward math-rock rhythm plays with analogue synth squeals, spidery basslines and a typically off-kilter vocal. It's fair to say that the gracefully tranquil hum of the gorgeous 'Remotely' is a world away from the utter insanity found elsewhere on the joyfully polylithic 'Exploding Views', an album that skips around genres, bringing its musical vision to life with bizarre instrumentation and many unusual ways to twist melodic yet skewed pop melodies into the sort of stuff that could seriously mess with one's head. Bristol-based SJ Esau is also known by his real name, Sam Wisternoff. A launch night for the album takes place this Saturday (March 1) at The Cube in Bristol, where Esau will be joined by support acts Tom OC and Jemima Surrender.

Collective-zine.co.uk summed it up well: "If Brian Cant and Derek Griffiths had formed a rap group after they left Play Away/School, this is probably what it would have sounded like... A British “Spiderman of the Rings”, without, it seems, the attendant NY hipster douchebaggery."

Press release: "In the first full length from Bristol’s SJ Esau since ‘Small Vessel’ was released on Anticon in 2008, one could not hope for a more sublime distillation of Sam Wisternoff’s unique sonic worldview. ‘Exploding Views’ is a record both muscular and confident; destroyed analogue synths, demented loops and violent drums set the stage for his lyrical ambushes and infectious melodies. With this experimental pop album, Wisternoff steps out from amongst the myriad musicians and vocalists from whose contributions he has woven many aspects of previous releases and takes the forefront.

‘Exploding Views’ is released on fromSCRATCH records on March 3rd 2014.  The CD, digital and vinyl releases will be followed by a limited edition DVD in which every track will be accompanied by full blown visual realisations made by Wisternoff, whose other gig is as a video artist under the “Ill Spectre Productions” moniker."




REWIND: The Supernaturals - 'Smile'

So only a few more days of our Britpop Month on God Is In The TV (and RW/FF) left, and after running through the Blurs and Suedes to the Casts and Supergrasses, then from the Northern Uproars and Menswears to the Marions and Salads, once you go past a certain point the quality suffers. So basically I've used up all of the good Britpop bands. However, Britpop means two things to me: music made by certain types of indie guitar bands released between 1994-1996, and the wider definition of Britpop that can be used to describe anything great and British that was popular in the 90s. For me, the proper Britpop era died as soon as Blur returned in early 1997 with the incredible 'Beetlebum', blowing away any association they had with the genre that they themselves had spawned. But the buzz died sometime around the latter part of 1996, after the big Oasis gig at Knebworth saw the era reach its ultimate peak and after Gareth Southgate's missed penalty against the Germans during Euro 96 saw English optimism take a beating. By this point record companies were signing up anyone British who could play a guitar, which led to some very weak copycat acts emerging and causing the public to grow tired of indie rock. 

I'd refer to The Supernaturals as more of a "post-Britpop" group, as they fitted in with the style and sound but arrived on the scene too late. They were bloody good too, taking inspiration from Brian Wilson and The Beach Boys rather than The Beatles or The Kinks. A five piece from Glasgow, the band were signed to Parlophone Records in 1996, scoring five Top 40 entries in the UK Singles Chart between '96 and '98. 'Smile' was originally released in 1996 as the band's debut single, but was reissued the following year and gave the band a Number 23 hit. Hard to believe that such a well known song didn't even reach the Top 20. In May of 1997 they released their debut LP 'It Doesn't Matter Anymore', (a Number 9 chart entry) but personally I prefer the 1998 follow-up 'A Tune A Day'. It was released during the same week that I went to see the band at the Fleece And Firkin in Bristol where they were supported by Carrie. Great days. After that album only reached #21 following a lack of promotion, they were dropped by their label before re-emerging four years later with their third, synth-flavoured effort 'What We Did Last Summer'. The band soon split after that.



Monday, 24 February 2014

REVIEW: Mark Morriss - A Flash Of Darkness (Acid Jazz Records)


Life after Britpop has been kind to some and cruel to others. The Bluetones didn't do too badly as they continued all through the 00's with a faithful fanbase in tow, but had to make do without any hit singles and TV appearances after 2003. Deciding that they had done as much as they could, the band called it a day with a triumphant 'lap of honour' tour in 2011. Frontman Mark Morriss certainly doesn't seem lost without his former bandmates on his new solo album, where his ear for infectious melodies remains very much intact. It's just as enjoyable as his former band's work and contains some of his all-time greatest moments. Although 'A Flash Of Darkness' is his first post-Bluetones outing, his solo debut was a folk-infused record from 2008 called 'Memory Muscle', a low key affair that seemed more like a relaxed side project. Now, with all his creative energy going into his solo work, his new one is definitely a more assured and full bodied work that will undoubtedly please all Bluetones fans, and an album strong and confident enough to also win him new converts.

The opening title track demonstrates his dazzling ability to conjure up dark edged power pop belters, this one played against a backdrop of moody flamenco flavours and Mariachi horns. The bright arrangements across these songs suggest Morriss has been thinking about how to fill the spaces left by the absence of his old bandmates, and the new ingredients are indeed something to relish. After all, as the man sang himself back in the 90s: "no problem should be faced without a little charm and a lot of style". Morriss skilfully and instinctively applies plenty of both throughout this excellent LP. The bittersweet beauty 'Consuela' is bursting full of charming pop hooks and lyrics that mix sadness with humour, brilliantly using TV detective Bergerac as a metaphor for someone staying on his case. 'Guilty Again' is firmly up there with the many highlights of his career, combining an energetic rhythm with wonderful acoustic arpeggios and sweet synth before hitting hard with the surging emotional urgency of its top notch chorus. The dark swing of 'It's Hard To Be Good All The Time' provides another Morriss classic and launches into a hugely enjoyable barroom piano solo during the bridge. 


A confident rendition of The Shins' 'Pink Bullets' could easily be an original MM composition if you weren't aware of the original, an example of how he always makes a song his own. Another of the album's high points is the superb 'Low Company', where Mark comes face to face with his regrets and past misdemeanours via a shady, sombre verse and a direct, irresistible chorus, while the brightly alluring 'Life Without Friction' puts an upbeat tune to a charmingly sad undercurrent, delivering another one of the many stand out tracks here. A quietly reflective story of denial and delusion, the dreamy acoustic 'This Is The Lie (And That's The Truth', playfully alternates the length of the wordless spaces during the verses to great effect and following it, the quirky, subtly electronic indie singalong of 'Space Cadet' is another beaming smile of a tune. After Kavinsky's electro pop nugget 'Nightcall' is given a deliciously shadowy acoustic-driven makeover that casts an even more unsettlingly dramatic atmosphere than the original, a brilliant LP like this deserves to finish on a spectacular ending, and so it does with the awesome 'Sleep Song' where a gentle, harmonious verse meets the full uproar of another storming chorus before chiming guitars accompany unexpected saxophone, lifting it further into the zone of magnificence.


It seems that carrying on by himself has gifted Mark Morriss a whole new lease of life, and 'A Flash Of Darkness' has confirmed him to be a great solo artist in his own right. Out of all the musical figures who emerged in the 90s, here is one still very much on top form. And he's certainly showing the more recent crop of guitar bands how memorable indie pop is done. 

8.5/10



Track Of The Day: John Bramwell - 'Mouth On Me (Live)'


Following on from their brilliant Top 10 album 'Let It All In' from 2013, I Am Kloot frontman John Bramwell is touring across the UK on his own. He has also released a live solo album 'Live At The Trades', which will only be available at these gigs. From the LP, you can get a free download of 'Fingerprints' HERE and you can listen to the lovely 'Mouth On Me' below. I had the pleasure of interviewing John last year, in an interview that you can read HERE. My glowing review of the lovely 'Let It All In' is HERE, and a report of a Bristol gig also from last year can be found HERE. See below for tour dates...


FEBRUARY
27TH CHESTER Telfords Warehouse
28TH CLITHEROE Grand

MARCH
7TH GLASGOW Stereo
8TH EDINBURGH Electric Circus
13TH LEAMINGTON SPA Assembly
14TH CARDIFF The Globe
15TH OXFORD Arts Bar
20TH CAMBRIDGE The Junction
21ST DERBY The Venue
22ND ST HELENS Citadel

APRIL
3RD NORWICH Arts Centre
4TH YORK National Centre of Early Music
12TH SHEFFIELD The Greystones
19TH KENDAL Brewery Arts Centre
30TH READING Sub 89

MAY
3RD LAUGHARNE Dylans Weekend
10TH NEWCASTLE Cluny
17TH LIVERPOOL Kazimier

JUNE
11TH BILSTON Robin 2
13TH HARPENDEN Public Halls, St Albans
14TH BRIDPORT Arts Centre

REWIND: Salad - 'Drink The Elixir'

Some of you readers may be wondering why every single 'REWIND' track has been from the mid 90's of late... This is because it is 'Britpop Month' on God Is In The TV, which is continuing until the end of the month. In April 1995 I purchased an issue of Smash Hits magazine which came with a free cassette tape entitled 'Smashing Hits'. As well as featuring the brilliant Dodgy (and horrible rubbish like Let Loose and the Lighthouse Family) it contained this song from British group Salad, which reached the dizzy heights of number 66 in the UK singles chart. Their album 'Drink Me' fared better, managing a Number 16 position. I know absolutely nothing else about this lot except for the fact that Charley Stone (later of Gay Dad) joined the band as a live guitarist, keyboard player and backing vocalist for a while in 1996. 


Sunday, 23 February 2014

Track Of The Day: The Hosts - 'Would You Be Blue?'

Having grown up in the golden age of indie guitar music, it's fair to say that a lot of the more traditional alternative pop bands of the last few days just don't give me the same thrill that the Britpop bands of my teen years did. Many of the new guitar groups that have emerged over the last few years just don't have the tunes, or any real distinguishing features. The Hosts are different. A quartet from Sheffield who channel 50's romanticism through their charming indie epics, their debut LP follows on from two excellent singles which are both present here. Two tracks were produced by Richard Hawley, who has clearly had a massive influence on the four piece's sound.

'Softly Softly' opens with the dazzling 'Would You Be Blue?', a radiant declaration of love which sparkles with plenty of magnificent pop hooks as well as a melody that could warm even the coldest of hearts. The track was also released earlier this week as part of a double A side with 'September Song'. One of their old press releases says: "The Hosts make a unique sound. Straddling the yesteryear romance of Roy Orbison and Buddy Holly, in a hazy soundscape recalling Phil Spector, The Velvet Underground and The Beach Boys, layered with percussion and a sharp vocal delivery that has given way to comparisons to The Walkman and Jonathan Fire Eater."



REWIND: Kula Shaker - 'Tattva'

"Today is definitely a Kula Shaker day and why? I don't know! had their songs in my head all day. Is Feb 23 significant for Kula Shaker? After some research, it turns out that their version of 'Hush' was in fact released 17 years ago tomorrow! So today is ALMOST significant for Kula Shaker! I knew it! Instincts don't lie..."

Here's another band whose sound was a million miles from Britpop, but whose success came as a result of the genre opening the doors for lots of other excellent British guitar groups. At first the music press seemed to really dig them, but as soon as they (deservedly) became popular, the critics suddenly turned on them and spent much of the late 90s attempting to discredit and dismiss them. The truth is that Kula Shaker were no more "cod-spiritual" than The Beatles and all the other greats whose music has absorbed Eastern influences. Dealing in psychedelica and Indian-flavoured 60's rock, their 1996 debut 'K' was a classic and so was its less successful 1999 follow-up 'Pigs Peasants And Astronauts'. After splitting at the end of the decade, Crispian Mills formed The Jeevas with a few members of post-Britpop combo Straw before recording a set of as yet unreleased solo tracks. Kula Shaker reformed in 2005 and have released another pair of impressive albums in the shape of 'Strangefolk' and 'Pilgrim's Progress', however they seem to have been on something of a hiatus for the last few years. With Mills moving into film directing and other band members concentrating on their own projects, it's unclear when we're going to see more activity from Kula Shaker but one can only hope that it's soon. Crispian lives in Bath, which is a local place that I visit regularly, so if I ever do bump into him I WILL request that he brings us more music! 


I'd usually feature one of their more underrated and unknown moments but since it's Britpop Month on God Is In The TV, I'm going to go with the 1996 classic that introduced my ears to this lot for the first time, a song which was a number 4 hit that same year. Interestingly, Wikipedia claims that "Pink Floyd's riffs from 'Shine On You Crazy Diamond' were sampled in the track, but not credited." 'Tattva' is a Sanskrit word meaning 'thatness', 'principle', 'reality' or 'truth'.



Saturday, 22 February 2014

Track Of The Day: Boys Noize - 'XTC (Chemical Brothers Remix)'

Alex Ridha is a German electro producer and DJ, better known as Boys Noize. On Feb 3rd, he released 'Out Of The Black – The Remixes', featuring reworkings of tracks from his 2012 LP 'Out Of The Black'. After telling my friend dance music enthusiast Jason B that I had received news about this release, he recommended that I check it out. Glad I did. After Ridha remixed The Chemical Brothers 2010 track 'Swoon', the Chems have returned the compliment with their brilliant take on 'XTC', which sticks the track in a time machine and rethinks it at a late 80's warehouse party before taking it forwards to 2014 with some excellent production.

The remix album was released on Boysnoize Records (BNR), a label founded in 2005 by Alex himself in order to retain full artistic freedom while releasing his own music under Boys Noize and other monikers. BNR quickly became a home for multidirectional and quality electronic music and the Berlin-based anarchist collective recently celebrated their landmark 100th release.


REWIND: Space - 'Neighbourhood'

It's hard to know whether people were laughing with or at Space when they released their debut album 'Spiders' in 1996. The quirky Liverpool band enjoyed eight Top 20 hit singles and released three albums, with a fourth remaining officially unreleased. They disbanded in 2005

In 2011, two years after the death of original drummer Andy Parle, the band announced they would reunite with Tommy Scott, Jamie Murphy and Franny Griffiths returning alongside three new members. Murphy left again in 2012, but the reformed Britpop era combo are preparing to release their first album in over a decade. 'Attack Of The Mutant 50ft Kebab' will be released March 17 on CD and vinyl... Tommy Scott's influence for the new songs stemmed from his infamous fascination with science and horror films, and he likens the album to a 'Fifties B-Movie' for the ears. Proud to note how Space have always stood out from the ‘normal,' Tommy concedes that their latest album has the usual signature Space quirkiness, with some extra ingredients added to the mix - he describes the songs as a mish-mash of SKA, Punk and the classic Space sound. "When we tour, we love playing the old stuff, but I always knew I wanted to record some new material. We know the fans like to hear the old classics from our multi-million selling albums 'Spiders' and 'Tin Planet', but we wanted to give them something extra.""

Here, from the 1996 album 'Spiders' is the excellent 'Neighbourhood'. Such an irresistible tune. I remember playing my cassette copy of this album a lot in our art lessons when I was in secondary school, and recall the class having a good old chuckle at the lyrics.



Friday, 21 February 2014

Track Of The Day: Temples - 'Sun Structures'

Temples only formed two years ago and have since blazed their way to critical acclaim with a number of outstanding singles, all of which are present on their awe inspiring debut album 'Sun Structures', which entered the Top 10 this week. 

Songwriters James Bagshaw (vocals/guitar) and Thomas Warmsley (bass/vocals) were previously members of mod revivalists The Moons, so a fondness for retro is something the pair have been known for. But there's a vitalising power in the music of Temples that transcends it above being a mere replica or imitation of the past. If anything, it invents its own version of the present, reconnecting with the far-out vibes of the 60's while bringing new ideas into the mix and always employing a refreshingly forward-thinking approach. The driving cosmic collision of the title track throws massive echo-drenched drums behind snapping eastern riffs and intense, spooked organ to create a wonder. By embedding an ear-catching sense of melody into their music and wiring the past to the present in an imaginative yet accessible way, Temples have raised the bar. The new wave of 21st century psychedelica produces a modern classic. Read my full album review HERE.